Privacy Matters

Edward Snowden: "We were involved in misleading the public."

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State Police tweets neglect to mention all the other people acting #peacefully

The Massachusetts State Police was out in force over Fourth of July weekend, and wanted the world to see just how attentive its officers were to security concerns surrounding the celebrations at the Esplanade. The police's media relations people tweeted tens of pictures of everything from an image of the video downlink from its surveillance helicopter (pictured above), to press conferences, to a photo of kids playing with a K-9 dog.

Company markets 24/7 school surveillance and monitoring

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Privacy and technology news: 7-5-13

Photo credit: Matt Wade

This news round-up was created by the ACLU of Northern California's Chris Conley

How to opt-out of Twitter's new tracking tool

Twitter has a new, suspiciously Facebook-like scheme to track its users across the web. If you'd like to opt-out of this tracking, you may do so very easily by clicking here, and making sure these boxes are unchecked:

Against fracking? The government thinks you might be a terrorist

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Happy Fourth of July, with a reminder to fight the surveillance state

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Ordering pizza in the big data surveillance state is about to get real. That is, unless we act.

Natsec mail covers program was ruled unconstitutional in 1979, so why is it still happening?

Image: New York Times, federal surveillance program
 
A massive postal letter surveillance program has been revealed by the New York Times, even though a federal judge ruled that a similar program was unconstitutional.
 

"I don't understand what's wrong with having some accountability": Students disrupt NSA recruitment session

An incredible thing happened yesterday. 

National Security Agency language specialist recruiters went to the University of Wisconsin, but their session did not turn out the way they might have hoped. That's because some courageous and brilliant students interrupted the recruiters by asking them pointed questions about what the NSA really does, against whom, and why.

Privacy and technology news: 7-2-13

These news round-ups are created by the ACLU of Northern California's Anna Salem

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