Privacy Matters

You have more rights to privacy in your phone when arrested than when at the airport

Last week, upon returning to his home state from a trip abroad, the mayor of Stockton, California got an abrupt education in post-9/11 constitutional decline.

Ars Technica reports:

ACLU goes to the hill for electronic privacy

Today the Joint Judiciary Committee of the Massachusetts state legislature holds a hearing on various bills of interest to the ACLU. Among them are a transgender rights bill and multiple bills related to electronic privacy.

Edward Snowden joins Twitter, immediately trolls the NSA

Ed Snowden, courageous whistleblower or traitorous scourge, depending on your orientation, has joined Twitter. He's already demonstrated that he's an expert troll.

Snowden's first tweet: "Can you hear me now?"

California school to begin tracking student irises on buses

Think of the children!

From the biometrics industry website

The Antelope Valley Schools Transportation Agency is considering the use of biometric iris scanners on special needs buses following the tragic death of a pupil.

What's the difference between online speech and offline speech? Nothing, says Mass. high court

by Jessie Rossman and Kade Crockford

Federal court: Government can't force you to give up your phone password

Please note that by playing this clip YouTube and Google will place a long term cookie on your computer.

Somerville Mayor to Middlesex DA: Drop all charges against the Somerville 18

In January 2015, 18 activists from the Boston area locked down on the region's busiest highway, snarling traffic in both north and south lanes, to protest anti-Black racism in policing. The Middlesex District Attorney's office slammed the protesters with charges including conspiracy to trespass, disorderly conduct, and resisting arrest. The 18 face jail time, thousands of dollars in fines, and over a year of probation.

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